White Roaches {The Science Behind White Cockroaches}

When you notice a white cockroach, you may think you have found a crucially rare species, maybe even an albino.

In reality, all roaches are white for fleeting periods of time throughout their lives due to the growth.

If you are thinking that albino cockroaches and the white roaches are identical, they aren’t! We will differentiate between both later on in this article.

So, let’s get more information about the white roaches in this article.

What is a White Cockroach?

You might have seen these white roaches here and there at your abode and wonder where they come from, what could be the cause of their whitish appearances.

A white cockroach is a juvenile that has molted recently as a process of its growth.

What Causes White Cockroaches?

Well, the real cause of a cockroach’s white color is due to a chemical reaction that occurs within its body.

It restores its original, brownish pigmentation after 12-14 hours. During this process, the white roach usually casts its exoskeleton. Once the process is done, the pigment transposes back into red/brown which is common in cockroaches.

The number of molts a nymph undergoes varies with species. With each successful molt, nymphs start to look more and more like their adult lifecycle.

When these pests outgrow their exteriors, known as the cuticle, they split the cuticle up and cast it. Their soft skin appears white. Within a few hours, their new cuticles will harden and darken in color, appearing more like the typical coloration of its species, i.e red/brownish.

For some species, their molted exterior serves as food material for both the nymph and the adult cockroaches.

Where do White Roaches Come From?

The white exterior is a result of a natural process that most cockroaches go through. Hence, they don’t come from one specific place. But it is always advisable to keep your environment clean and have healthy personal hygiene.

Cockroach infestations may lead to the spreading of infections and could even trigger asthma. Their fulcrum presence in homes is a problem because it suggests breeding has taken place in the house. That needs to be taken care of!

Is a White Cockroach an Albino Cockroach?

Talking in regards to Albino roaches, some roaches undergo an incomplete metamorphosis and consequently need to shed their protective exoskeletons so that they could mature.

Each time this exoskeleton is shed, the cockroach has a fresh, white, exoskeleton that will eventually showcase the brown tone that is most naturally occurring. This is the albino cockroach that we get to see occasionally.

Why White Roaches are Rarely Seen?

The molting process of white roach happens anywhere in-between a few minutes to a few hours. Due to this limited time frame, it becomes difficult to spot a cockroach while it is going through molting exercise.

The above reason coupled with the fact that most cockroaches hide really well, even under normal circumstances, might lead us to believe they are a rare species. When in reality, they are not rare as such.

Do White Roaches Bite?

Yes, these roaches can bite humans, and cockroach bites are most likely to occur while sleeping, in the dark. They do not feed on blood & they don’t bite out of defense or not aggressive insects by nature.

Roaches prefer to bite on eyelashes, feet, dead skin and nail tips just when it is dark. And they even prefer breeding in the dark and unclean surfaces of the house, be it interiors or exteriors of the house.

Final Words

We have covered all there is to cover relating to white roaches, and hope that the myths revolving around them are broken as well.

In the simplest term, a white cockroach is a normal cockroach going through a shedding process. And the process is somewhat similar to puberty that humans go through.

Dinesh Kumar
Dinesh has a few years of experience in Pest control. Apart from his interest in sports, he has helped many people to get rid of cockroaches and other pests.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *