Do Cockroaches Feel Pain? | Everything You Want to Know

Published by Vijay Singh on

A lot of people ask a straightforward question each time they request for a pest control treatment – Do roaches feel pain? It seems quite simple. However, the science on these subject isn’t settled as most people would assume.

Moreover, if we should talk about the pain, we need to understand that depression is a complex neurological and emotional experience. This complexity does vary from one person to another – similar to insects also.

Therefore, if we can admit that pain is subjective on certain levels, then it no simple answer for scientists to come up with quickly. Understanding the potential indicator of pain in animals seems to be yet settled.

Do Cockroaches Feel Pain

Do Roaches Feel Pain?

Research is making use of behavioral changes in animals to have a clue of what is going amiss. For instance, you find it hard to connect with your dog on a social level or cat hardly eat.

Certain animals have a way of showing discomfort: mice, horse, and rabbits – which are usually studied using a grimace scale. The scale was first developed primarily to evaluate pain in little kids. A rabbit exhibit the one of following behaviors when its hurt: stiffen his whiskers, pin the back of its ears or marrow his eyes.

Not to make this complicated, you should also be aware that animals are no longer wanted to be seen from the point of weakness anymore – thanks to evolution. Why? They need their predator understand they are strong and do not want to be vulnerable to predator attacks.

Sadly, roaches can make facial expression or sounds that would give us a genuine proof that tells us a lot about how they feel. So is there any way to know what these little creeping insects feel pain?

Scientist view on Cockroaches

The mammal brain is more complicated than insects’ brain. Many insects have their body parts little, a little bigger than the dense node of the neutron which primary aim is controlling insects’ body parts and stimuli processing. Though the insects’ brain appears different, it still performs specific functions similar to the human brain.

For example, the human minds have nociceptors that handle pain processing and stimuli response. These nociceptors in charge of pain can’t be found anywhere in a roach brain, yet studies show that they respond in facsimile manner to humans with activated nociceptors.

According to the above, we can all stick to a consensus that roaches do not experience the same sort of consciousness as the one human tend to suffer. In other words, cockroaches and other insects can respond to any form of stimuli, but it is impossible for roaches to learn from its experience or identifies a pattern.

It is indeed impossible to find a cockroach grieving over the demise of its mate, or fellow creeping insects – as a human would do if placed in the similar situation.

Bottom Line

It is challenging to say roaches feel pain as we do. In other to be able to feel pain, the organism must be capable of emotional experience, which involves memory and different process not directly tied to a stimulus-response.

They might be able to respond to external stimuli like light, sound, touch, etc. but to say roaches feel pain and return to its emotional part– might not be the case.

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Categories: General Information

Vijay Singh

Vijay Singh has a few years of experience in Pest control. Apart from his interest in sports, he has helped many people to get rid of cockroaches and other pests.

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